Resus Days

Practice Saving Lives While Playing a Game

Resus Days is a resuscitation game to help healthcare professionals practice some quick-thinking needed for care of cardiopulmonary emergencies. Using gamification to deliver a simulation game for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Check the below resources, the first level is free to try it out.

The Blurb

Rehearse life-saving decision-making in a fun, game environment. Resus Days is a simulation game for healthcare professionals to practice some quick-thinking needed for care of cardiopulmonary emergencies. You are the team leader in the resuscitation team. Your task is resuscitate the patient until he is back to a normal heart rhythm (normal sinus rhythm). The game includes 7 levels covering cardiac arrest, bradycardia, tachycardia, and simulated megacode. The first level (cardiac arrest) is free to play. If you like it, an in-app purchase will unlock six additional levels.

Keywords: #resuscitology #gamification

The game homepage is: https://resusdays.com

 

 

 

Gaming Addiction: Disorders Due to Addictive Behaviours

As education continues with an increasingly e-learning approach to delivery, its worthwhile to consider some of the precautionary aspects. Gamification and social media may enhance and offer different learning opportunities but the potential to create or exacerbate disorders due to addictive behaviours from gaming addiction, will need to be considered when delivering the e-learning approach and consideration of the well-being of students. Patterns of gaming behaviour when interfering with normal daily activities, and any changes in physical or psychological health will need to be monitored.

World Health Organisation: International Classification of Diseases (ICD)

Disorders due to addictive behaviours from gaming addiction:

“Gaming disorder is defined in the draft 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) as a pattern of gaming behavior (“digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterized by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences” (WHO, 2018).

 

Symptoms to monitor:

  • impaired control over gaming (frequency, intensity, duration)
  • increased priority given to gaming
  • continuation or escalation of gaming despite negative consequences

Gamification

Some questions around gaming:

  • Keen gamer or problem with addiction, at what point is too much and does age/maturity need to be factored into the guidelines?
  • How does a sensible mix of connectivity with social media, gaming, work and social time look?
  • The developing technology such as augmented reality (AR), simulation technology and virtual reality (VR). How will they be introduced and controlled?

A quick Google Scholar search using ‘gaming addiction’ shows there are plenty of research papers on this topical subject.

References

Petry, N. M., & O’brien, C. P. (2013). Internet gaming disorder and the DSM‐5Addiction108(7), 1186-1187.

Woodward, A. (2018). The World Health Organization Identifies Gaming Disorder as a Mental Health Condition. Futurism.com

World Health Organisation. (2018). Gaming Disorders.