Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM)

Some resources just stand out in their innovation, quality and delivery, and Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) has to be one of the best for education. This organisation is part of the free open access to medical education (#FOAMed) movement, so its all accessible. It shows if you don’t have access to journals, books or higher education, that the online world can still help supplement your education theory and development with peer reviewed resources. Take a look at the incubator project, is this the start of challenging the traditional education pathways? If the doctors can do it, surely nurses can be inspired to create a community of learning away from the traditional sources of knowledge and make learners as co-designers and change the agility in knowledge translation and evidence based practice?

Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM)

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eBook of the ALiEM blog series available for review and to join the peer review process.

Community of practice approach to learning networks.

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“The ALiEM Faculty Incubator Project is a year-long professional development program for educators, which enrolls members into a mentored digital community of practice. This small, 30-person, exclusive community will stoke the fires of creative engagement through mentorship and collaboration. We aim to strengthen your educational skills and produce tangible works of scholarship. Our goal is to construct a curriculum, delivered to you in a closed digital platform, and help you launch and accelerate your career development.”

Lacking in academic integrity I hear you say, take a look at the publication list around learning, education and social media from their team.

 

Follow the @ALiEMteam on Twitter.

 

 

 

Social Media Analytics & Big Data: Symplur Healthcare Hashtags

Using analytics and big data in education can provide patterns of communication and connectivity when engaging on social media platforms. Following a hashtag from a conference, online journal club, Tweetchat or online forum can open up a new community of practice around various healthcare specialities. As a facilitator wouldn’t you want to look at the trending words, discussion themes, the number of connections (network analysis) and members of the community (and the influencers)?

Tools such as Symplur can provide social media analytics.

Here are a couple of hashtags to follow and see who the main influencers are:

  1. #FOANed
  2. #eNurse
  3. #nurseeducator
  4. #Ecmologist (one for the future?)

 

Published Articles Using Analytics 

Nason, G. J., O’Kelly, F., Bouchier-Hayes, D., Quinlan, D. M., & Manecksha, R. P. (2015). Twitter expands the reach and engagement of a national scientific meeting: the Irish Society of UrologyIrish Journal of Medical Science (1971-)184(3), 685-689.

Roland, D., Spurr, J., & Cabrera, D. (2017). Preliminary evidence for the emergence of a health care online community of practice: using a netnographic framework for Twitter hashtag analyticsJournal of medical Internet research19(7).

Thoma, B., Rolston, D., & Lin, M. (2014). Global emergency medicine journal club: Social media responses to the march 2014 annals of emergency medicine journal club on targeted temperature management. Annals of Emergency Medicine64(2), 207-212.

Eye Gazing

Do we interact and engage with our phones more than we do with our fellow humans? Interesting question, and this is where eye gazing comes in to remind us of the connection and interactions we make though our eyes. These are important questions as we spend our lives connected through work and play in an online world and in particular social media platforms. As the real world becomes entwined with virtual reality and robots, what will our lives look like in the future and how will humans connect? If technology increases in healthcare, what will the nurse-patient relationship look like?

Keywords: Trust, connection, healing, bonding, sacred, relaxing, spiritual.

Where Has Human Connection Gone?

 

Eye Gazing With Strangers

 

Resources

Kajimura, S., & Nomura, M. (2016). When we cannot speak: Eye contact disrupts resources available to cognitive control processes during verb generation. Cognition157, 352-357.  [abstract]

Nursing Education Network. (2018). Meet The Avatars: Virtual Reality and Virtual Humans.

SBS. (2018). Look Me In The Eye.

The Rise of eSports

eSports 

Moving from the bedroom to filling out stadiums, welcome to eSports. Think this is just a hobby? Think again. With increasing sponsorship and media interest, this a rising sporting extravaganza. Take a read of this great review on the atmosphere and experience attending an eSports event by MishManners.

A little About eSports 

FIFA Interactive World Cup

 

The following is a list of eSports resources and tournaments.

ESPN. (2018). eSports.

FIFA.com (2018). FIFA eWorld Cup 2018.

MishManners. (2018). Australia takes Esports to the Next Level. Hackathon Queen.

Red Bull eSports. (2018). eSports.

Wikipedia. (2018). eSports.

Wikipedia. (2018). Lists of eSports leagues and tournaments.

From the Premier League, Manchester City and West Ham United have signed up an eSports player as member of their squad to represent them in eSports competitions.

 

The Celebrity Millionaires of Competitive Gaming

 

Resus Days

Practice Saving Lives While Playing a Game

Resus Days is a resuscitation game to help healthcare professionals practice some quick-thinking needed for care of cardiopulmonary emergencies. Using gamification to deliver a simulation game for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Check the below resources, the first level is free to try it out.

The Blurb

Rehearse life-saving decision-making in a fun, game environment. Resus Days is a simulation game for healthcare professionals to practice some quick-thinking needed for care of cardiopulmonary emergencies. You are the team leader in the resuscitation team. Your task is resuscitate the patient until he is back to a normal heart rhythm (normal sinus rhythm). The game includes 7 levels covering cardiac arrest, bradycardia, tachycardia, and simulated megacode. The first level (cardiac arrest) is free to play. If you like it, an in-app purchase will unlock six additional levels.

Keywords: #resuscitology #gamification

The game homepage is: https://resusdays.com

 

 

 

Blog It: Free Open Access to Nursing Education (#FOANed)

This poster was submitted to the 17th National Nurse Education conference (#NNEC18) and is based around Free Open Access to Nursing education (#FOANed) and specialist online communities of practice (eCOP) that can develop with social media. The blog metrics to measure the global reach of Nursing Education Network, are a method for showing the impact of social media and the numbers of interactions related to the blog. Analytics from WordPress.com and Google analytics can be used to demonstrate analysis of post views, users, blog views, visitor city and country data to show the potential global reach.

This post has also been shared as part of the #WeNurses and #WeCommunities project #70nursebloggers & #70midwifebloggersThe aim is to inspire 70 nurses / student nurses / midwives / student midwives to blog in order to raise profile of what nurses and midwives do and nurses & midwives blogging and to celebrate 70 years of the NHS. If anyone wants to write a blog post, more than happy to upload into this site.

References

Rozenblum, R. and Bates, D. W. (2013). Patient-centred healthcare, social media and the internet: the perfect storm?. BMJ Quality & Safety.

DeCamp, M., Koenig, T. W., & Chisolm, M. S. (2013). Social media and physicians’ online identity crisisJAMA310(6), 581-582.

Carroll, C., Bruno, K., & Vontschudi, M. (2016). Social Media and Free Open Access Medical Education: The Future of Medical and Nursing Education? American Journal of Critical Care: An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 25(1), 93-6.

Moorley, C. R., & Chinn, T. (2014). Nursing and Twitter: creating an online community using hashtagsCollegian21(2), 103-109.

Royal College of Nursing (RCN). (2016). Every nurse an e-nurse. Digital capabilities for 21st century nursing. Retrieved from https://www.rcn.org.uk/clinical-topics/ehealth/current-work

The Top Ten Websites in Critical Care Medicine Education Today (Journal Club)

Journal Club Article: Wolbrink, T. A., Rubin, L., Burns, J. P., & Markovitz, B. (2018). The Top Ten Websites in Critical Care Medicine Education TodayJournal of intensive care medicine, 0885066618759287.

Background

Looks at the rapid growth of online educational resources in the critical care environment. From another review by Kleinpell et al (2011) which identified 135 websites, only 67 now are still available online. This demonstrates a rapidly changing environment and provides a rationale for this papers focus.

Methods

  • Literature review and web search.
  • Website assessment using the Critical Care Medical Education Website Quality Evaluation Tool (CCMEWQET).
  • Evaluation and ranking of identified websites.

Results

  • 97 websites relevant critical care websites were identified and scored.
  • Common types of resources, included blog posts, podcasts, videos, online journal clubs, and interactive components such as quizzes.
  • Almost one quarter of websites (n 22) classified as Free Open Access to Medicine (FOAM) websites.
  • Top 10 websites analysed and described. “Most often included an editorial process, high-quality and appropriately attributed graphics and multimedia, scored much higher for comprehensiveness and ease of access, and included opportunities for interactive learning.”

The Top Ten 

In alphabetical order:

FOAM Highlight

“The majority of FOAM website domains were not educational, nonprofit, or governmental. The FOAM websites were updated more recently than the other critical care medicine educational websites” (pg. 5).

References

Kleinpell, R., Ely, E. W., Williams, G., Liolios, A., Ward, N., & Tisherman, S. A. (2011). Web-based resources for critical care educationCritical Care Medicine39(3), 541-553.

Olusanya, O., Day, J., Kirk-Bayley, J., & Szakmany, T. (2017). Free Open Access Med (ical edu) cation for critical care practitionersJournal of Intensive Care Medicine.

Wolbrink, T. A., Rubin, L., Burns, J. P., & Markovitz, B. (2018). The Top Ten Websites in Critical Care Medicine Education TodayJournal of Intensive Care Medicine. 0885066618759287.

Gaming Addiction: Disorders Due to Addictive Behaviours

As education continues with an increasingly e-learning approach to delivery, its worthwhile to consider some of the precautionary aspects. Gamification and social media may enhance and offer different learning opportunities but the potential to create or exacerbate disorders due to addictive behaviours from gaming addiction, will need to be considered when delivering the e-learning approach and consideration of the well-being of students. Patterns of gaming behaviour when interfering with normal daily activities, and any changes in physical or psychological health will need to be monitored.

World Health Organisation: International Classification of Diseases (ICD)

Disorders due to addictive behaviours from gaming addiction:

“Gaming disorder is defined in the draft 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) as a pattern of gaming behavior (“digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterized by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences” (WHO, 2018).

 

Symptoms to monitor:

  • impaired control over gaming (frequency, intensity, duration)
  • increased priority given to gaming
  • continuation or escalation of gaming despite negative consequences

Gamification

Some questions around gaming:

  • Keen gamer or problem with addiction, at what point is too much and does age/maturity need to be factored into the guidelines?
  • How does a sensible mix of connectivity with social media, gaming, work and social time look?
  • The developing technology such as augmented reality (AR), simulation technology and virtual reality (VR). How will they be introduced and controlled?

A quick Google Scholar search using ‘gaming addiction’ shows there are plenty of research papers on this topical subject.

References

Petry, N. M., & O’brien, C. P. (2013). Internet gaming disorder and the DSM‐5Addiction108(7), 1186-1187.

Woodward, A. (2018). The World Health Organization Identifies Gaming Disorder as a Mental Health Condition. Futurism.com

World Health Organisation. (2018). Gaming Disorders.