Recording: Multimedia Production Part 3

Use you mobile phone, laptop or tablet for quality video recordings. Just check your device to see what video recording and editing software you already have. There are lots of options available for editing but as a beginner using your devices editing software or using YouTube may be the easier and less frustrating approach until you build up your recording skills.

Some considerations:

  • Lighting
  • Stability (use two hands or a selfie stick)
  • Audio and background noise
  • Point of view: where is the camera focused on
  • Framing: orientation of the camera
  • Clean your lens

Inclusivity

Don’t forget to add captions and subtitles [more info here].

Multimedia Posts

Storyboard: Multimedia Production Part 2

Storyboarding

 “A storyboard is a graphic organizer in the form of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence” (Wikipedia, 2019).

Example of a Storyboard

Storyboard for The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

Storyboard Resources

ACMI. (2019). Storyboarding for the beginner.

ACMI. (2019). Storyboard Template.

Classic Disney Animation

Editing Resources

IT skills and budget are likely key factors in finding suitable editing resources. Here are a few, but a quick internet search will show many available resources. 

Inclusivity 

Don’t forget to review accessibility during the creation of resources for neurodiversity inclusiveness.

Multimedia Posts

 

 

Multimedia Production: Part 1

This is the first post in the journey for development in multimedia production. I have minimal experience in photography or video production and so this is also a personal learning project. Any useful resources will be shared to enable nurse educators to give it a try themselves (anyone with multimedia experience please add resources in the comments section below). A ‘traditional’ nurse educator approach will be used (i.e. no budget), so whatever resources we already have or can borrow will be used.

  1. First step will be the process of multimedia production.
  2. Step two will be the production side of things.
  3. Step three the equipment, likely using a mobile phone and any free developing apps and potentially a borrowed GoPro.
  4. Step 4 creating and collating playlists

Video 101: Shooting Basics from Vimeo Video School

Rule of Thirds

“The guideline proposes that an image should be imagined as divided into nine equal parts by two equally spaced horizontal lines and two equally spaced vertical lines, and that important compositional elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections (Wikipedia, 2019).

Rivertree thirds md
Image by Moondigger [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

The Applicability of Community of Inquiry Framework (Journal Club)

Journal Club Article: Smadi, O., Parker, S., Gillham, D., & Müller, A. (2019). The applicability of community of inquiry framework to online nursing education: A cross-sectional studyNurse education in practice34, 17-24.

Background

The lack of rigorous evidence based research to guide e-learning in higher education, which is especially relevant with the rapid adoption of e-learning, which is often part of a blended learning approach (Garrison, 2011).

“While discussion forums and video conferencing are very common in online courses, LMS also include a range of more interactive features and advanced functions such as customized learning pathways, collaborative content, peer interaction and assessment workshops, file sharing, real-time messaging, and wiki forums. However, according to Christie and Jurado (2009), these interactive features are not widely used by the course designers. Shea and Bidjerano (2009b) report that designers of online courses and educational providers are often confused about how to integrate new technologies into online learning environments in ways that will enrich student learning.”

The Community of Inquiry Framework

“The Community of Inquiry framework originated in the work of Dewey (1938), Peirce (1955), and Lipman (2003). Garrison et al. (2000) broadened and adapted the Community of Inquiry framework for e-learning education by viewing it through the lens of social, cognitive, and teaching presences.”

Community of Inquiry framework (Garrison et al., 2000):

  1. Social Presence
  2. Cognitive Presence
  3. Teaching Presence

Study Aim

The projects aims were to explore the following questions:

1. What is the awareness and knowledge of Australian nursing educators about the CoI framework?
2. What is the participants’ attitudes on the applicability of the CoI framework to online nurse education courses?

Study Design

An online survey tool which was divided into three sections:

  1. Demographic information,
  2. The applicability of community of inquiry presences,
  3. Awareness and knowledge of  Community of Inquiry.

Participants: Nurse educators from 34 higher education universities providing nurse education to international students.

Limitations: The survey tool was an adaptation of a validated tool. The limited response from using an online survey approach.

Results

From 138 respondents from a possible 1201 (response rate 11.5%):

    • The current used mode of teaching is blended learning (BL) (83%).
    • Nurse educators ranked BL as the best suited teaching mode for nursing education (90%).
    • Ninety percent (90%) of the participants are involved in curriculum design.
    • (90%) of the participants viewed instructional design and framework as significant to build an online course.
    • However, (70%) declared they don’t use explicit theoretical framework to guide the design/evaluation of online education.
    • Participants highly ranked the three core concepts of CoI framework as applicable for online nursing education.
  • (20%) of the participants are familiar with CoI framework, of them (79%) are likely to recommend CoI framework to a colleague.

Summary

“This study has shown the perceived importance of instructional design and theoretical framework to build an online courses for nurse educators using blended learning. Since Community of Inquiry framework has been shown to improve student satisfaction and decrease attrition in non-health disciplines, the implementation of Community of Inquiry framework in nurse education should be investigated more. Community of Inquiry provides a comprehensive framework relevant to face-to-face, blended, and online education with the potential to embed numerous technology-linked interventions within a Community of Inquiry framework.

These results provide the impetus for further investigation of factors influencing the development of online nurse education including the specific consideration of CoI frameworks.”

Keywords: Community of inquiry; Online education; Theoretical framework; Blended learning; E-learning

Reference

Smadi, O., Parker, S., Gillham, D., & Müller, A. (2019). The applicability of community of inquiry framework to online nursing education: A cross-sectional studyNurse education in practice34, 17-24.

Nursing Education Network Stats 2018

As part of open access and the #FOANed community, here is a summary of this blogs yearly stats (ending Dec 7, 2018). Thank you to everyone who follows and supports this site.  

Views by Countries (Top 12)

In this one year period there were visitors from 144 different countries.  

Views by Post (Top 12) 

Views & Visitors Monthly Data 2018



Warm wishes for a happy new year from Nursing Education Network. Posts will start again from 8th Jan, 2019. 

Education Delivery Resources

This is part III of organising posts from this blog into grouped resources for the nurse educator, and the focus is on the delivery of education (Part I: The Nurse Educator Role and Part II: Adult Learning Theory).

Subject intended learning outcomes (SILOs) are explicit statements of what a learner is expected to achieve, and to what standard or level of achievement (Biggs and Tang, 2011). When creating nurse education and training in the workplace, simulation centre or higher education setting, the importance of designing intended learning outcomes are vital. ILOs are central to the design of teaching and assessment so should be part of the initial planning phases.

Education Delivery

Choosing the delivery method of the learning activity and any related tasks provides a stage for effective teaching and engagement from the participants perspective. The nurse educator needs to consider the best method/s for delivering content. Here are some education delivery focused resources:

The below links are to the resources focusing on the educator role and education theory.

 

Educational Challenges of Interprofessional Practice Education

What Is Interprofessional Learning?

Interprofessional practice education (IPE) has been defined by the Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education (CAIPE) as two or more professions “learning with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and quality of care” (Barr, 2002).

In order to improve outcomes across healthcare through collaboration there is the need to “learn with, from, and about each other” (World Health Organization, 2010).

WHO (2010) framework for interprofessional education and collaborative practice key messages are:

  • “Interprofessional education occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes.
  • Interprofessional education is a necessary step in preparing a collaborative practice-ready health workforce that is better prepared to respond to local health needs.
  • Collaborative practice happens when multiple health workers from different professional backgrounds work together with patients, families, carers and communities to deliver the highest quality of care” (pg 7).

 

The Players

Nursing, medical, allied health (physical therapist, pharmacy, social work, speech and language) and this is within the hospital environment, the next level is how to then collaborate between the hospital with community services.

IPE occurs formally and informally, from a clinical practice view, we have likely experienced the debrief of a clinical incident within the workplace (Nisbet et al. 2007).

Educational Challenges

One of the main questions from an educational perspective will be to consider what IPE learning should focus on (O’Keefe, Henderson & Chick, 2017). Is it the procedural (technical skills) or soft skills (non-technical skills) that are key learning? There will be the need for education faculty to be trained in delivering IPE (Watkins, 2016).

There is an identified need in healthcare for experiential learning opportunities, set in the clinical environment and not just in the simulation laboratory or higher education settings, (Shrader et al, 2018). Difficulties of delivering IPE in the higher education, such as logistics of collaboration around busy schedules, resources, accreditation and varied assessments (O’Keefe, Henderson, & Chick, 2017). To deliver within the clinical environment these factors need to be considered to ensure effective training focuses on improving consumer outcomes, collaboration and evidence based practice.

 

IPE Barriers

  • Professional silo’s, not to breakdown but connect.
  • Understanding each professions roles and responsibilities.
  • Scope of practice.
  • Difficulties of delivering IPE in higher education.
  • Traditional workplace hierarchy of top down approach, the collaborative IPE challenges these values and beliefs in order to change culture.
  • Interprofessional feedback process across different professions and skill mix. Skilled and structured feedback is required to maintain trust and enquiry in a safe environment.
  • Resources to deliver quality simulation, both technical and non-technical skill training.
  • Learning from mistakes and shared learning in the no-blame culture of healthcare.

Essential Components For IPE

Steven et al. (2017) identified these essential components from IPE education programs:

  1. Knowledge for practice,
  2. Skills for practice,
  3. Ethical approach,
  4. Professionalism,
  5. Continuing professional development (CPD),
  6. Patient-centered approach,
  7. Teamwork skills.

The Future

The recognition for collaborative practice and improved consumer outcomes through dedicated IPE programs delivered by specific IPE faculty (Bridges et al, 2011).

There will be a need for interprofessional competencies as IPE in the education and the workplace occurs, and how these fit into specific regulatory requirements will have to be considered (Englander et al, 2013).

References

Ausmed (2018). Position Statement: Interprofessional Continuing Education.

Ausmed (2018). Interprofessional Education in Healthcare – Exploring the Benefits.

Ausmed (2018). Meeting the Challenges of Interprofessional Collaboration.

Barr, H. (2002). Interprofessional Education: Today, Yesterday and Tomorrow. CAIPE and LTSN Centre for Health Science and Practice.

Bridges, D., Davidson, R. A., Soule Odegard, P., Maki, I. V., & Tomkowiak, J. (2011). Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education.

Englander, R., Cameron, T., Ballard, A. J., Dodge, J., Bull, J., & Aschenbrener, C. A. (2013). Toward a common taxonomy of competency domains for the health professions and competencies for physicians. Academic Medicine, 88(8), 1088-1094.

Hunt, S. (2007). Participatory community practice: Developing interprofessional skills. Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal, 8(3), 71.

O’Keefe, M., Henderson, A., & Chick, R. (2017). Defining a set of common interprofessional learning competencies for health profession students. Medical teacher, 39(5), 463-468.

Nisbet, G., Thistlethwaite, J., Moran, M., Chesters, J., Jones, M., Murphy, K., & Playford, D. (2007). Sharing a vision for collaborative practice: the formation of an Australasian interprofessional practice and education network (AIPPEN). Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-disciplinary Journal, 8(3), 1.

Shrader, S., Jernigan, S., Nazir, N., & Zaudke, J. (2018). Determining the impact of an interprofessional learning in practice model on learners and patients. Journal of interprofessional care, 1-8.

Steven, K., Howden, S., Mires, G., Rowe, I., Lafferty, N., Arnold, A., & Strath, A. (2017). Toward interprofessional learning and education: Mapping common outcomes for prequalifying healthcare professional programs in the United Kingdom. Medical teacher, 39(7), 720-744.

Watkins, K. D. (2016) ‘Faculty development to support interprofessional education in healthcare professions: A realist synthesis’, Journal of Interprofessional Care, 30(6), pp.

World Health Organization. 2010. Framework for action on interprofessional education and collaborative practice. WHO Press.

 

 

 

Artificial Intelligence in The Classroom: A Step Too Far?

Education Approach

This is called the Intelligent Classroom Behavior Management System and is using facial recognition technology system to scan and observe student’s behaviour in the classroom. 7 difference expressions are recognised such as angry, disappointed, happy, neutral, sad, scared and surprised (yet no bored classification!). The system scans the students every 30 seconds so no room for a quick sleep or messing around here.

A.I. Too Far?

Imagine being constantly watched in the classroom. The systems allows greater feedback and classroom awareness, but what about the impact on behaviour and creativity? This has the potential for enforcing expected behaviours and expressions, rather than allowing individuality. All to much like big brother for me, take a read of 1984 by George Orwell. But it will be interesting to see how surveillance and AI is viewed by students and societies across the world. Let’s hope student freedom to learn is the focus and not safety fears.

Resource

Techjuice. (2018). This school scans classrooms every 30 seconds through facial recognition technology.

 

Reflection on Conference Versus Unconference: Notes & Thoughts

My main reflection point is the difference in my motivations for attending, one was it was new and innovative, the other was to submit a research project and update clinical evidence based knowledge. So really they are just two separate entities, although if learning is going on then we should look at ways to enhance delivery and engagement.

Here are some of my thoughts on some of the differences:

  • Structure & Format.

The unconference was a new concept and all about the unknown, whilst the traditional conference was scientific, clinical focused and had a fully structured program. They are chalk and cheese so comparison is so reliant on personal perspective and I think they are so different but maybe there is space in the traditional format to enhance the dialogue and engagement with some open discussion sessions.

  • Preparation

For the unconference, the use of dialogue in communicating ideas was to be used. So pre-reading for myself was Isaacs, W. (1999). Dialogue and the art of thinking together : A pioneering approach to communicating in business and in life (1st ed.). New York: Currency. Then practicing on Trello which was used for the online discussion and resource platform.

  • Room set up: how does this impact on dialogue opportunities.

The traditional is still set up for presenting the powerpoint, with rows of seats and ‘sage on the stage’ stuck behind the lectern. It’s all too passive. Questions from the audience are minimal in this set up and often time runs out to have any discussion. The unconference used a variety of available rooms but all used the circle approach for a safe container for discussion.

  • Active & Engaged.

The passive approach versus the engaged. Time went so fast in the unconference, coffee breaks were missed and the day passed quickly. The unknown really generates excitement. Interesting presentations at the formal approach also got the crowd engaged and discussing. The majority were clinical focused and so followed the usual scientific template, and this may well be the correct way to deliver (I just dont know).

gray owl perching on brown post under blue sky during daytime

  • Who gets to talk, is it across the floor or is the “guru” the only voice?

The unconference was varied, some spoke more than others so we will look at everyone’s comments to see if others had a different experience. But discussion came from all participants. The use of storytelling around clinical experiences was a common tool in the unconference. The formal conference was all about the experts, little voice from attendees.

  • Presentation styles

In the unconference, the key trigger presentations set the background, added some ideas and then set the tone for the group discussion. It felt complimentary and then the participants went looking for issues and answers, not the expert providing their summary.

  • Online participation

The unconference offered some online aspects, with uploading of recorded key trigger presentations, active access to the Trello platform. As with most conferences the risk of unreliable wi-fi made for a cautious approach. Its also very difficult to facilitate face to face discussion, with online participants and to integrate the two. One for the future is to learn if better tools are available to meet the needs of online participants.

  • Use of social media tools

Platforms such as Slack, Trello and Twitter were part of the unconference format and so encouragement to engage was provided. Twitter analytics were followed using Symplur as well. For the traditional, individuals were using social media platforms but not much engagement came from the formal bodies.

  • Networking opportunities

No difference but the scale. The unconference is a new collaboration across disciplines so is hopefully the start of an community of practice that flourishes.

  • Learning

Learning occurred in both formats, just on different topics. I am a big believer in motivation and what makes you attend. They were both in my own time, so i had bought into both programs.

This is one persons thoughts, experiences and biases. A wider perspective is needed. In the end, they are delivering different products but it’s good to reflect and consider what learning is occurring and how best to facilitate.