Reflection on Conference Versus Unconference

Pre-Attendance Reflection

This week will be a very interesting experience on the educational front as I attend a 1 day unconference and after a formal 3 day clinical focused conference. Leading up to the unconference is really exciting as the day has the usual venue, rooms, an outline of the day but also has online participants. The program is also not filled with presenters, just a few ‘key trigger’ talks and then who knows where the journey goes from there. There are facilitators to guide the process but the content and direction will be driven by the participants. This is so different to anything I have ever experienced before and makes for something really new to engage in as community of healthcare educators. The formal conference has the usual structure of location, rooms, set times for presentations, sponsored sessions and also social networking events. I have a copy of the 3 day timetable and have set out my itinerary of sessions I want to attend so I feel as I know what to expect. I am motivated to attend but am not sure of my level of participation in the formal conference, likely as a receiver of information.

My observation aims during these conferences are:

  • Room set up: how does this impact on dialogue opportunities.
  • The atmosphere.
  • Who gets to talk, is it across the floor or is the “guru” the only voice?
  • Facilitation style
  • Presentation styles
  • Online participation
  • Use of social media tools
  • Networking opportunities
  • Interprofessional healthcare collaboration or traditional hierarchies
  • Feedback from participants
  • Did I learn anything?

I will add my reflections post attendance in a weeks time after the events have finished. ‘Notes and Thoughts’ will be added on topics from the conferences on a day to day basis as well.

Unconference

“An unconference is a participant-driven meeting. The term “unconference” has been applied, or self-applied, to a wide range of gatherings that try to avoid one or more aspects of a conventional conference, such as fees, sponsored presentations, and top-down organization” (Wikipedia, 2018).
The Unconference

Heutagogy: is learning where the focus is learner centred with a self-determined learning approach.

Collaborative Interdisciplinary Unconference 2018

Calling all Educators – Make a difference in ICU Education: A crowd-source organised conference aimed at developing the field of interprofessional critical care education, training, teamwork and patient-centred care with the ANZ Clinical Educators’ Network in collaboration with ANZICS, ACCCN, CICM(ANZ). Physically located in Adelaide, SA.

Follow #unconfed and Symplur conference #unconfed hashtag for social media discussion.

Resources

Budd, A., Dinkel, H., Corpas, M., Fuller, J. C., Rubinat, L., Devos, D. P., … & Sharan, M. (2015). Ten simple rules for organizing an unconference. PLoS Computational Biology, 11(1), e1003905.

Carpenter, J. P., & Linton, J. N. (2018). Educators’ perspectives on the impact of Edcamp unconference professional learning. Teaching and Teacher Education, 73, 56-69.

Nursing Education Network. (2016). Heutagogy and Nursing.

Seeber, I., De Vreede, G. J., Maier, R., & Weber, B. (2017). Beyond Brainstorming: Exploring Convergence in TeamsJournal of Management Information Systems34(4), 939-969.

 

 

 

 

Life Connected: Creating a Blog in Nursing

This blog is 18 months old, has 170 posts and increasing numbers of visitors so it’s going well in its little niche area of nurse educator resources. The ‘we’ has become ‘me’ in the last 12 months due to other work commitments, training and exams for my co-creator. So here are a few things I have reflected on during the blogging journey:

  1. Writing skills – I keep the posts short and hopefully focused for learning on the go. I just don’t have the storytelling skills that I see other blogger’s use. I feel more confident in using an approach that is comfortable for me, and hopefully others find useful.
  2. Positive Approach- The sharing and discussion around resources, rather than the critique continues to be the focus. I am not a professor or an academic so I will leave the critiquing to the experts.
  3. Lifelong Learning – I love all the clinical, education and other array of resources that I read as preparation for the blog posts. I have continued with reading education focused books post qualification which is a major positive part of ongoing development.
  4. Learning Networks –  Mainly through social media platforms has expanded from the critical care community to a wider nursing network, but also wider to those in school and higher education, business leaders and motivators and authors/journalists. With this, the topics I am exposed to are so varied.
  5. Social Media – Tricky one with recent privacy issues in the news, but let’s focus on the agile sharing and discussion of evidence based practice.
  6. Discussion – there has been a few comments on posts but not as much discussion as I thought may be generated directly on the blog. However, discussion is occurring on other social media platforms so it may be just how people prefer to communicate in different media.
  7. Education not clinical focused – I have avoided any clinical nursing discussion and hopefully this keeps the blog away from the grey areas of clinical advice, accountability and professionalism!
  8. Slide-ology – I have tried to make the blog more visual, but this is okay if you have the internet bandwidth. I wonder if the images and embedded videos need to be removed and keep it plain text to enable true accessibility.
  9. FOANed – It’s still advert free and independent- but I have to work a few extra shifts to pay for the yearly costs of running the blog.
  10. Open Access – it’s complicated, but I do think all of healthcare (including patients/consumers) needs access to the best current evidence and this is not the case.
  11. Heutagogy –  amazing online resources being created by nursing students across the world. Impressed and in awe of their knowledge, awareness, mindfulness and reflections.
  12. Frequency of posts – It’s a balance with work, study, other projects and something called free time. I have at times been prepared with posts ready for the next 2 months, then in contrast it has ran on a week to week basis. Balancing work and formal study, the frequency has reduced from a post every 3 days to once per week but all academic assignments and deadlines were met.
  13. The blog is my organised notes – I can refer back to posts and resources with such ease, rather than searching through note books and folders.
  14. CPD – my hours are well and truly met.
  15. Coding – still on the to do list!
  16. Community of Practice – Part of the nurse blogging “WeNurses” community as part of the #NHS70 celebrations.
  17. Does the blog need a peer review process or keep it agile? One to ponder for the future.
  18. Fun – it’s actually been a rewarding experience.

Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM)

Some resources just stand out in their innovation, quality and delivery, and Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) has to be one of the best for education. This organisation is part of the free open access to medical education (#FOAMed) movement, so its all accessible. It shows if you don’t have access to journals, books or higher education, that the online world can still help supplement your education theory and development with peer reviewed resources. Take a look at the incubator project, is this the start of challenging the traditional education pathways? If the doctors can do it, surely nurses can be inspired to create a community of learning away from the traditional sources of knowledge and make learners as co-designers and change the agility in knowledge translation and evidence based practice?

Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM)

Image result for aliem

eBook of the ALiEM blog series available for review and to join the peer review process.

Community of practice approach to learning networks.

Image result for aliem

“The ALiEM Faculty Incubator Project is a year-long professional development program for educators, which enrolls members into a mentored digital community of practice. This small, 30-person, exclusive community will stoke the fires of creative engagement through mentorship and collaboration. We aim to strengthen your educational skills and produce tangible works of scholarship. Our goal is to construct a curriculum, delivered to you in a closed digital platform, and help you launch and accelerate your career development.”

Lacking in academic integrity I hear you say, take a look at the publication list around learning, education and social media from their team.

 

Follow the @ALiEMteam on Twitter.

 

 

 

Social Media Analytics & Big Data: Symplur Healthcare Hashtags

Using analytics and big data in education can provide patterns of communication and connectivity when engaging on social media platforms. Following a hashtag from a conference, online journal club, Tweetchat or online forum can open up a new community of practice around various healthcare specialities. As a facilitator wouldn’t you want to look at the trending words, discussion themes, the number of connections (network analysis) and members of the community (and the influencers)?

Tools such as Symplur can provide social media analytics.

Here are a couple of hashtags to follow and see who the main influencers are:

  1. #FOANed
  2. #eNurse
  3. #nurseeducator
  4. #Ecmologist (one for the future?)

 

Published Articles Using Analytics 

Nason, G. J., O’Kelly, F., Bouchier-Hayes, D., Quinlan, D. M., & Manecksha, R. P. (2015). Twitter expands the reach and engagement of a national scientific meeting: the Irish Society of UrologyIrish Journal of Medical Science (1971-)184(3), 685-689.

Roland, D., Spurr, J., & Cabrera, D. (2017). Preliminary evidence for the emergence of a health care online community of practice: using a netnographic framework for Twitter hashtag analyticsJournal of medical Internet research19(7).

Thoma, B., Rolston, D., & Lin, M. (2014). Global emergency medicine journal club: Social media responses to the march 2014 annals of emergency medicine journal club on targeted temperature management. Annals of Emergency Medicine64(2), 207-212.

Eye Gazing

Do we interact and engage with our phones more than we do with our fellow humans? Interesting question, and this is where eye gazing comes in to remind us of the connection and interactions we make though our eyes. These are important questions as we spend our lives connected through work and play in an online world and in particular social media platforms. As the real world becomes entwined with virtual reality and robots, what will our lives look like in the future and how will humans connect? If technology increases in healthcare, what will the nurse-patient relationship look like?

Keywords: Trust, connection, healing, bonding, sacred, relaxing, spiritual.

Where Has Human Connection Gone?

 

Eye Gazing With Strangers

 

Resources

Kajimura, S., & Nomura, M. (2016). When we cannot speak: Eye contact disrupts resources available to cognitive control processes during verb generation. Cognition157, 352-357.  [abstract]

Nursing Education Network. (2018). Meet The Avatars: Virtual Reality and Virtual Humans.

SBS. (2018). Look Me In The Eye.

The Rise of eSports

eSports 

Moving from the bedroom to filling out stadiums, welcome to eSports. Think this is just a hobby? Think again. With increasing sponsorship and media interest, this a rising sporting extravaganza. Take a read of this great review on the atmosphere and experience attending an eSports event by MishManners.

A little About eSports 

FIFA Interactive World Cup

 

The following is a list of eSports resources and tournaments.

ESPN. (2018). eSports.

FIFA.com (2018). FIFA eWorld Cup 2018.

MishManners. (2018). Australia takes Esports to the Next Level. Hackathon Queen.

Red Bull eSports. (2018). eSports.

Wikipedia. (2018). eSports.

Wikipedia. (2018). Lists of eSports leagues and tournaments.

From the Premier League, Manchester City and West Ham United have signed up an eSports player as member of their squad to represent them in eSports competitions.

 

The Celebrity Millionaires of Competitive Gaming

 

Resus Days

Practice Saving Lives While Playing a Game

Resus Days is a resuscitation game to help healthcare professionals practice some quick-thinking needed for care of cardiopulmonary emergencies. Using gamification to deliver a simulation game for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Check the below resources, the first level is free to try it out.

The Blurb

Rehearse life-saving decision-making in a fun, game environment. Resus Days is a simulation game for healthcare professionals to practice some quick-thinking needed for care of cardiopulmonary emergencies. You are the team leader in the resuscitation team. Your task is resuscitate the patient until he is back to a normal heart rhythm (normal sinus rhythm). The game includes 7 levels covering cardiac arrest, bradycardia, tachycardia, and simulated megacode. The first level (cardiac arrest) is free to play. If you like it, an in-app purchase will unlock six additional levels.

Keywords: #resuscitology #gamification

The game homepage is: https://resusdays.com