The Top Ten Websites in Critical Care Medicine Education Today (Journal Club)

Journal Club Article: Wolbrink, T. A., Rubin, L., Burns, J. P., & Markovitz, B. (2018). The Top Ten Websites in Critical Care Medicine Education TodayJournal of intensive care medicine, 0885066618759287.

Background

Looks at the rapid growth of online educational resources in the critical care environment. From another review by Kleinpell et al (2011) which identified 135 websites, only 67 now are still available online. This demonstrates a rapidly changing environment and provides a rationale for this papers focus.

Methods

  • Literature review and web search.
  • Website assessment using the Critical Care Medical Education Website Quality Evaluation Tool (CCMEWQET).
  • Evaluation and ranking of identified websites.

Results

  • 97 websites relevant critical care websites were identified and scored.
  • Common types of resources, included blog posts, podcasts, videos, online journal clubs, and interactive components such as quizzes.
  • Almost one quarter of websites (n 22) classified as Free Open Access to Medicine (FOAM) websites.
  • Top 10 websites analysed and described. “Most often included an editorial process, high-quality and appropriately attributed graphics and multimedia, scored much higher for comprehensiveness and ease of access, and included opportunities for interactive learning.”

The Top Ten 

In alphabetical order:

FOAM Highlight

“The majority of FOAM website domains were not educational, nonprofit, or governmental. The FOAM websites were updated more recently than the other critical care medicine educational websites” (pg. 5).

References

Kleinpell, R., Ely, E. W., Williams, G., Liolios, A., Ward, N., & Tisherman, S. A. (2011). Web-based resources for critical care educationCritical Care Medicine39(3), 541-553.

Olusanya, O., Day, J., Kirk-Bayley, J., & Szakmany, T. (2017). Free Open Access Med (ical edu) cation for critical care practitionersJournal of Intensive Care Medicine.

Wolbrink, T. A., Rubin, L., Burns, J. P., & Markovitz, B. (2018). The Top Ten Websites in Critical Care Medicine Education TodayJournal of Intensive Care Medicine. 0885066618759287.

Mix It Up Book Club: The Classics

Inspiration and thought can come from an array of sources. I have recently tried to make a focused effort on adjusting the balance of healthcare and normal reading material that I read, incorporating the classics onto my ‘to do’ reading list. This approach is part of that work/life balance ethos that can become skewed when all your focus is on studies or completing a work based project. Avoiding that path to burnout is key.

Book Club:

  • Orwell, G. (1945). Animal Farm. New American Library.
  • Orwell, G. (1950). 1984. New American Library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Avoiding the clear political messages, the importance of finding individuality and choice is very real when one considers the way social media platforms may track and direct our focus. Will future generations have a multitude of choice when engaging in life and work in the online world, or will only a handful of multinational corporations exist?

Keywords: Big Brother; Thought Police; Totalitarian Dystopia; Orwellian.

References

Orwell, G. (1945). Animal Farm. New American Library.

Orwell, G. (1950). 1984. New American Library.

Penguin Books (2018). Your Classic Books Reading Challenge.

Wikipedia (2018) Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Want Your Graduates to Succeed? Teach Them to Think!

Journal Club Article: Caputi, L. J., & Kavanagh, J. M. (2018). Want Your Graduates to Succeed? Teach Them to Think!. Nursing education perspectives39(1), 2-3. [abstract]

Thinkers and Knowledge Workers

This guest editorial discusses the importance and need for the preparation of new graduate nurses for the complex demands of professional practice they are about to enter. The challenge of the “explosion of knowledge, intensify the need to produce graduates able to succeed in the demanding world of healthcare as thinkers and knowledge workers.” 

The power to think in an age of information technology that brings information overload, add to this the increase in healthcare knowledge, research publications and curriculum content overload, the world the graduate nurse now enters is very different with each passing year and academia needs to deliver appropriate education.

Critical Thinking & Reasoning

The transition shock into practice from undergraduate to qualified nurse and the subsequent responsibilities are well known , with the subsequent impact on turnover rates for newly qualified nurses (Duchscher, 2009). Marry all this with increased inpatient acuity yet decreased length of hospital stay, and the healthcare system is a stressful and challenging work environment. Linking quality care delivery with the competency of the nurses is key, with critical thinking and reasoning, essential components of the preparation-practice gap.

Tanner’s Clinical Judgement Model

Academia must use a framework to teach clinical reasoning and clinical judgement such as Tanner’s (2006) 4 Step Approach to Clinical Reasoning:

  1. Noticing
  2. Interpreting
  3. Responding
  4. Reflecting

Summary

“The key to new-graduate success and improving patient outcomes might well lie in the way we teach students to think – something to think about.”

KeywordsCritical thinking; Knowledge worker; Reflection; Take the time; Motivation; Think, Think.

 

References

Caputi, L. J., & Kavanagh, J. M. (2018). Want Your Graduates to Succeed? Teach Them to Think!. Nursing education perspectives39(1), 2-3. [abstract]

Duchscher, J. E. B. (2009). Transition shock: the initial stage of role adaptation for newly graduated registered nursesJournal of advanced nursing65(5), 1103-1113.

Tanner, C. A. (2006). Thinking like a nurse: A research-based model of clinical judgment in nursingJournal of nursing education45(6).

Outliers: The Story of Success (Book Club)  

Book Club: Gladwell, M. (2008). Outliers: The Story of Success. Hachette UK. [sample here]

It’s More Than Just Talent

Outliers are “people who are invariably the beneficiaries of hidden advantages and extraordinary opportunities and cultural legacies that allow them to learn and work hard and make sense of the world in ways others cannot” (Gladwell, 2008).

Contributors To Success

    • Practice makes perfect- the 10,000 hours practice rule (Deliberate Practice).
    • The importance of cut off points in the calendar year in sport and schooling, related to age, development and subsequent opportunities.
    • Opportunity: the right time and place, what is happening to the wider world at the time of the person’s key development stages.
    • The impact of legacy.
    • Examples provided of the success stories of Bill Joy, Bill Gates & The Beatles.
    • IQ is not enough. The Terman IQ study of the gifted demonstrates that intelligence does not equal success (Terman, 1959).

Malcolm Gladwell Explains

 

References

Gladwell, M. (2008). Outliers: The story of success. Hachette UK. [sample here]

Kaufman, S. (2009). The Truth about the Termites. Psychology Today.

Nursing Education Network. (2017). Deliberate Practice: Practice like you play.

Terman, L. (1959). The Gifted Group at Mid-Life: Thirty-five Years Follow-up of the Superior ChildStanford University Press.

Wikipedia (2017) Outliers.

An Integrative Literature Review of Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators

Journal Club Article: Breytenbach, C., ten Ham-Baloyi, W., & Jordan, P. J. (2017). An Integrative Literature Review of Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators. Nursing Education Perspectives38(4), 193-197. [abstract]

Keywords: Evidence-Based Teaching; integrative review; teaching; nurse educator.

Background

Evidence-based teaching strategies in nursing education are fundamental to promote an in-depth understanding of information. The teaching strategies of nurse educators should be based on sound evidence or best practice.

Method

Integrative literature review of sixteen studies.

Findings

Eight teaching strategies were identified:

  1. E-learning
  2. Concept mapping
  3. Internet-based learning (IBL)
  4. Web-based learning
  5. Gaming
  6. Problem-based learning (PBL)
  7. Case studies
  8. Evidence-based learning (EBL)

The following three strategies of concept mapping, IBL and EBL provided the highest level increase in knowledge.

Conclusion

All teaching strategies enhanced the learning experience, but more research is needed. A multi-modal approach to teaching and delivering content is required to suit the content, situation and learner.

Reference

Breytenbach, C., ten Ham-Baloyi, W., & Jordan, P. J. (2017). An Integrative Literature Review of Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators. Nursing Education Perspectives38(4), 193-197. [abstract]

Journals For The Nurse Educator To Follow

Keeping up to date with the latest clinical nursing and healthcare developments is a challenging process, then throw in additional education focused literature and your into information overload territory.  To keep relevant and aware of current healthcare educational focused research, here are some resources that may help (no conflict of interest to report). As ever please add any suggestions of other resources you know about in the comments section at the bottom of this post and I will update the below resource list.

Journals To Follow: 

To organise your favourite journals or browse collections to keep up with the latest research:

A few predatory journals also exist out there in publishing land so beware.

The Chimp Paradox: Book Club

Book: Peters, S. (2013). The Chimp Paradox: The Mind Management Program to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence, and Happiness. Tarcher.

Optimising the Performance of the Human Mind: Steve Peters at TEDxYouth

References

Chimp Management (2017) The Chimp Model.

Fotheringham, A. (2012). Dr Steve Peters: From chimps to champs.

Peters, S. (2013). The Chimp Paradox: The Mind Management Program to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence, and Happiness. Tarcher.

Wikipedia (2017) Steve Peters (psychiatrist).

Variatio Est Mater Studiorum (Journal Club)

Journal Club Article: Marton, F., & Trigwell, K. (2000). Variatio est mater studiorum. Higher Education Research & Development19(3), 381-395. [abstract]

“There is no learning without discernment.  And there is no discernment without variation.”

  • Rote learning and the difference between variation and repetition. Memorising is not consistent with understanding.
  • Transfer allows the individual to move out of context, community or situation and use past learning from another situation and relate this between the two situations.
  • Motor learning and variability of practice is required.
  • Error free learning does not yield learning.
  • The space of learning provides the conditions learning takes place.
  • Participation and the concept of learning communities.

Keywords: Variation theory, phenomenography; transfer; experiential; participation; learning communities.

References 

Marton, F., & Trigwell, K. (2000). Variatio est mater studiorum. Higher Education Research & Development19(3), 381-395. [abstract]

Nursing Education Network (2017) Sameness and difference in transfer.

Educational Research: The Qualitative Path

Book Club: Creswell, J. W. (2012). Educational research: Planning, conducting, and evaluating quantitative. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. [Link to 4th edition]

As I transitioned between the worlds of healthcare and higher education, I noted the differences in approaches and considerations to the hierarchies of research and evidence base. In healthcare the RCT is the respected way forward, but in education I was learning to ‘look through the lens’ and value qualitative research. Now I am aware that in nursing, a strong body of qualitative literature exists, but in the world of critical care it’s fair to say that quantitative methods rule. In educational research, John Hattie has utilised the ‘big data’ approach and created some of the first meta-analysis data and findings to guide theory and curriculum in education.

As I critiqued the articles for my academic projects, my biases and preconceptions around qualitative research, no doubt impacted on any critical analysis formed. However, the theoretical frameworks and paradigms led me to a new world of epistemelogical, ethnography, action research, phenomenology, grounded theory, mixed methods and the narrative. I found educational articles are sometimes long and extremely ‘wordy’, and took many twists and turns before getting to the main points. But I grew to appreciate the narrative studies, where the researcher embeds themselves in the lives of the subjects and their everyday lives are brought out in the stories being told. The Hawthorne effect and one person’s biases, are two quick critiques of such an approach but the art of storytelling can provide so much more for the reader than a table of statistics.

Some appreciations of educational qualitative research:

  • The search for “The Truth” by Roller (2013)
  • Engaging in the environment
  • Collecting the data in qualitative research
  • Theoretical frameworks and paradigms
  • Process in identifying key themes
  • Ethical issues within qualitative research
  • The qualitative versus quantitative debate

The same steps of the quantitative research process occur in the qualitative approach, where the identification of a need or a problem occurs, this then provides the road map for the research journey. The justification and how then the project will be of benefit still needs to be explained in the research methodology.

Here are a small sample of the education focused articles that were part of my formal studies:

Just recently this discussion on Twitter around a journal now only accepting quantitative articles for submission. Some fields of healthcare research are really only suitable for the qualitative methodology and not to be classified as a p value.

 

References

Creswell, J. W. (2012). Educational research: Planning, conducting, and evaluating quantitative (pp. 146-166). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. [Link to 4th edition]

Hattie, J. (2008). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Routledge [sample].

Ismail, S. (2009). Popular pedagogy and the changing political landscape: a case study of a women’s housing movement in South AfricaStudies in Continuing Education31(3), 281-295.

Kalman, J. (2000). Learning to write in the streetInternational Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education13(3), 187-203.

Larsson, S. (2009). A pluralist view of generalization in qualitative researchInternational journal of research & method in education32(1), 25-38.

Roller, M. (2013) Distinctive qualities of qualitative research. Research Design Review.

Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory

Book Club: Gardner, H. (2011). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. Basic books. (review)

Domains of Intelligence

Multiple-intelligence

“The theory of multiple intelligences differentiates intelligence into specific ‘modalities’, rather than seeing intelligence as dominated by a single general ability. Gardner opposes the idea of labeling learners to a specific intelligence. Gardner maintains that his theory should “empower learners”, not restrict them to one modality of learning” (Wikipedia, 2017).

Learning Modalities

  • Active learning
  • Hands on
  • Exploration
  • Questionning
  • Transform understanding
  • Individuality in learning
  • Active assessments

Looks Like Learning Styles

A major criticism of the the theory, is that it is very similar to learning styles theory, and both are missing supporting evidence to support such an educational approach. This lack of empirical evidence is summarised by Waterhouse (2006).

The Educator Role

The end point is to empower the learner, and for the teacher to improve learning situations. Different learning intelligence’s may be considered more relevant in the diverse world of real work-life situations, especially when compared to standardised intelligence and validity of IT tests which can be classified as “mainstream” assessments. Is this a theory which is too hard to measure due to the individualistic and non-tangible aspects or simply lacking in hard evidence?

Supporting Resources

Gardner, H. (2011). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. Basic books (review).

Harvard Graduate Scool of Education (2017) Project Zero.

Hattie, J. (2011). Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning. New York, NY: Routledge. (summary).

Northern Illinois University (2017). Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center.

Nursing Education Network. (2016) Learning Styles.

Waterhouse, L. (2006). Multiple intelligences, the Mozart effect, and emotional intelligence: A critical reviewEducational Psychologist41(4), 207-225.

Wikipedia. (2017). Theory of Multiple Intelligences.