Education In Healthcare

Introduce and provide an overview of education theories:

  • Constructivism
  • Experiential Learning
  • Communities of Practice (CoP’s)

This is the first presentation from the Nursing Education Network series. All based on microlearning, they will be short quick snippets on education topics to provide an introductory overview.

Tools for Knowledge and Learning: A Guide for Development and Humanitarian Organisations

Journal Club Article: Ramalingam, B. (2006). Tools for knowledge and learning: A guide for development and humanitarian organizations. London: Overseas Development Institute.

Background

“No one should be dying or suffering because knowledge that already exists in one part of the world has not reached other parts. It is up to each of us to take the responsibility to ensure the knowledge flows easily to where it is needed” (Geoff Parcell, Learning to Fly, 2006).

The application of learning and knowledge based strategies derived from learning from lessons of the past and from elsewhere, to then overcome the challenges and boundaries of time and space.

Strategies of the Learning Organisation

A Holistic View of Knowledge and Learning Tools

  • Organisational contexts: Strategic alignment, management behaviours, institutional pressures, funding cycles, historical evolution.
  • Relationships and collaborations: within and across organisation – via networks, ICTs, communications plans; core functions; support functions.
  • Organisational knowledge: Forms and locations; creation, sharing, storage, use; key activities and tools; relevance, how the message is packaged and communicated.

Five Competencies Framework (Collison & Parcell, 2001)

Aim: “To work out how well they are performing against organisationally established criteria for knowledge and learning, and to identify goals and priorities for improvement. The competency framework works on the principle that effective knowledge and learning is based on improving performance in:

  1. Strategy Development
  2. Management Techniques
  3. Collaboration Mechanisms
  4. Knowledge Sharing and Learning Processes
  5. Knowledge Capture and Storage.”

Knowledge Audits: Taking a systematic and strategic approach to knowledge and learning can help to integrate the diverse activities of an organisation, and facilitate more productive processes of knowledge sharing and dialogue between internal and external stakeholders.

Social Network Analysis: a research technique that focuses on identifying and comparing the relationships within and between individuals, groups and systems in order to model the real-world interactions at the heart of organisational knowledge and learning processes.

Most Significant Change (MSC): the process involves the collection of significant change (SC) stories emanating from the field level, and the systematic selection of the most important of these by panels of designated
stakeholders or staff.

Outcome Mapping: As development is essentially about people relating to each other and their environments, the focus is on people.

Visioning

A facilitator supports use of imagination to think of the ideal workspace, organisation and what the 5 year plan looks like,

Management Techniques

The SECI Approach

“There are four key processes through which tacit and explicit knowledge interact, namely, socialisation, externalisation, combination and internalisation. Together, these processes make up the SECI principles.

  • Socialisation allows to share tacit knowledge
  • Externalisation converts tacit into explicit knowledge
  • Combination combines different types of explicit knowledge
  • Internalisation converts explicit into tacit knowledge.”

SECI model of Knowledge creation.

Lewin’s Force Field Analysis

“Force Field Analysis was developed by Kurt Lewin (1951) and is widely used to inform decision making, particularly in planning and implementing change management programmes in organisations.”

 Activity Based Knowledge Mapping

“Is a tool which enables knowledge inputs and outputs to be
linked in a systematic fashion to ongoing organisational activities and processes – from office mail to strategic reviews.”

Other resources are also discussed.

Team Collaboration

“Team development has been described in terms of five stages, beginning with a simple ‘membership’ group, and working through ‘confrontation’ to a ‘shared-responsibility’ group (Bradford and Cohen, 1998). Bradford and Cohen suggest that the different stages of groups differ in terms of the following characteristics:

• Atmosphere and relationships
• Understanding and acceptance of goals
• Listening and information sharing
• Decision making
• Reaction to leadership
• Attention to the way the group is working.”

Communities of Practice

Action Learning Sets

Six Thinking Hats

Mind Maps or Concept Mapping

Social technologies for collaboration

Knowledge Sharing & Learning

  • Storytelling
  • Peer programs
  • Challenge sessions
  • How to guides
  • Blogs
  • Reviews and retrospects
  • Intranet resources

Additional Resources

Collison, C., & Parcell, G. (2001). Learning to fly: Practical lessons from one of the world’s leading knowledge companies. Capstone Ltd. [GoodReads]

Davies, R., & Dart, J. (2005). The ‘most significant change’(MSC) technique. A guide to its use.

Earl, S., Carden, F., & Smutylo, T. (2001). Outcome mapping: Building learning and reflection into development programs. IDRC, Ottawa, ON, CA.

Ramalingam, B. (2005). Implementing Knowledge Strategies: From Policy to Practice in Development Agencies. ODI Working Paper 244, London: ODI.

#Unconference: Journal Club

Journal Club Article: Carpenter, J. P., & Linton, J. N. (2018). Educators’ perspectives on the impact of Edcamp unconference professional learningTeaching and Teacher Education73, 56-69.

The Unconference or Edcamp

“Similar to other unconferences, Edcamps reject many traditional conference elements such as advance agendas and pre-planned presentations in order to avoid limiting participants’ creativity, collaboration, and engagement.”
Educator Professional Learning Development
“Many educators, scholars, and policy makers concur that educator professional learning is key to the improvement of teaching and student learning.”
Research Aims
1. What were participants’ perceptions regarding the impact of Edcamps on their educational practice?
2. What were participants’ perceptions regarding the impact of Edcamps on their students’ learning?
3. What factors did the participants identify as hindering and supporting their use of what they learned at Edcamps?
Participants
Survey sent 4-8 months post participation in an Edcamp.
  • Survey participating educators (N= 105), of which 88% were female.
  • Interview and focus group participants (N= 18), of which 55.6% were female.

The female ratio was consistent with the US education workforce.

Results

  • n=96 (91.4%) of respondents indicated that they had changed their practices as result of their Edcamp participation. Most commonly described changes were use of technology and use of new instructional strategies.
  • Perceived that those changes had some kind of positive impact on student learning, although this impact was not always quantifiable in terms of traditional measures of student achievement such as test scores.
  •  Teacher collaboration increased following Edcamp participation, particularly collaboration facilitated through technology among members of a professional learning network (PLN).
  • Participation provided new experiences for students and enabled students to gain new skills.
  • n=65 (61.9%) of participants reported that they encountered some type(s) of obstacles, barriers, or challenges as they tried to use what they learned via their Edcamp experience.

Limitations

Self reporting method, also the fact the educators participated in the Edcamp may indicate a motivated sample of educators.

Conclusions

“Participants overwhelmingly asserted that they had changed their practices as a result of their participation in Edcamps.

The Edcamp model appeared to positively affect teaching and learning while respecting the participants’ motivations, autonomy, experiences, and ultimately their professionalism and capacity to engage in complex intellectual work.

Those who organize and facilitate education conferences could apply our findings to identify new possibilities for conference structure and format.”

Reference

Carpenter, J. P., & Linton, J. N. (2018). Educators’ perspectives on the impact of Edcamp unconference professional learningTeaching and Teacher Education73, 56-69.

Playlists: Multimedia Production Part 4

Create a Video Playlist

You may be uploading and creating your own video playlist, or collating a playlist of useful resources to suit a particular topic. Here are some resources to consider using. Please post in the comments section any other resources that are available.

  • Viewer playlists – organise your favourite videos and share. No creation of videos is required, you are just grouping together useful resources to share.
  • Creator playlists – if you create videos it provides a way to organise videos into topics and for viewers to find them.
  • Organised into subject content, theme or whatever you choose.
  • Videos are organised in a legal format for yourself and others to view.
  • Can embed into a website or resource.
  • Can provide analytics.

Example: Nursing Education Network Playlist

How To Make A YouTube Playlist

Why To Make a YouTube Playlist

Some Persuasive Data from YouTube Statistics:

  • YouTube has over a billion users — almost one-third of all people on the Internet — and every day people watch hundreds of millions of hours on YouTube and generate billions of views.
  • YouTube overall, and even YouTube on mobile alone, reaches more 18-34 and 18-49 year-olds than any cable network in the U.S.
  • Growth in watch time on YouTube has accelerated and is up at least 50% year over year for three straight years.

Data from YouTube Statistics

Other video player resources: Vimeo or Apple.

Teaching And Learning Through Video 

Multimedia Posts

Recording: Multimedia Production Part 3

Use you mobile phone, laptop or tablet for quality video recordings. Just check your device to see what video recording and editing software you already have. There are lots of options available for editing but as a beginner using your devices editing software or using YouTube may be the easier and less frustrating approach until you build up your recording skills.

Some considerations:

  • Lighting
  • Stability (use two hands or a selfie stick)
  • Audio and background noise
  • Point of view: where is the camera focused on
  • Framing: orientation of the camera
  • Clean your lens

Inclusivity

Don’t forget to add captions and subtitles [more info here].

Multimedia Posts

Storyboard: Multimedia Production Part 2

Storyboarding

 “A storyboard is a graphic organizer in the form of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence” (Wikipedia, 2019).

Example of a Storyboard

Storyboard for The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

Storyboard Resources

ACMI. (2019). Storyboarding for the beginner.

ACMI. (2019). Storyboard Template.

Classic Disney Animation

Editing Resources

IT skills and budget are likely key factors in finding suitable editing resources. Here are a few, but a quick internet search will show many available resources. 

Inclusivity 

Don’t forget to review accessibility during the creation of resources for neurodiversity inclusiveness.

Multimedia Posts

 

 

Multimedia Production: Part 1

This is the first post in the journey for development in multimedia production. I have minimal experience in photography or video production and so this is also a personal learning project. Any useful resources will be shared to enable nurse educators to give it a try themselves (anyone with multimedia experience please add resources in the comments section below). A ‘traditional’ nurse educator approach will be used (i.e. no budget), so whatever resources we already have or can borrow will be used.

  1. First step will be the process of multimedia production.
  2. Step two will be the production side of things.
  3. Step three the equipment, likely using a mobile phone and any free developing apps and potentially a borrowed GoPro.
  4. Step 4 creating and collating playlists

Video 101: Shooting Basics from Vimeo Video School

Rule of Thirds

“The guideline proposes that an image should be imagined as divided into nine equal parts by two equally spaced horizontal lines and two equally spaced vertical lines, and that important compositional elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections (Wikipedia, 2019).

Rivertree thirds md
Image by Moondigger [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

Biohacking

What Is Biohacking?

Biohacking (verb, noun) by Dave Asprey (@Bulletproof):

(v): changing your environment from the inside-out so you have full control of your biology; using your body as your personal laboratory, finding the exact hacks that work for you.

(n) The art and science of becoming superhuman.

Superhuman

So in healthcare this approach could provide a way to deliver individualistic care to suit the biology of the person. Or if they are a biohacker they will likely be very informed of their personal health status and preferences and can drive this personalised approach (#expertpatient)

Biohacking You Can Do It Too by Ellen Jorgensen on TED

Topics related to biohacking from Wikipedia (2018):

Keywords: Biotechnology; Genomics; DNA; Biohacking

Biohacking Resources

Asprey, D. (2018). Going Bulletproof for Beginners. Bulletproof.com

BBC. (2018). Biohacking series.

DIYbio

Genspace

The Personal Genome Project