The Role of Debriefing in Simulation-Based Learning. 

Journal Club Article: Fanning, R. M., & Gaba, D. M. (2007). The role of debriefing in simulation-based learning. Simulation in Healthcare, 2(2), 115-125.

Purpose

Determining what is important in the aspects of debriefing within simulation based learning.

Background

The importance of remembering the adult learner, and all the experience they bring through knowledge, assumptions and feelings. Active participation and leveling (#Heutagogy) of the traditional hierachies between teacher and learner are part of the adult learning philosophy. The adult learner is seen as self-directed, motivated and learns from meaningful and work related education that can applied in workplace.

“Adults learn best when they are actively engaged in the process, participate, play a role, and experience not only concrete events in a cognitive fashion, but also transactional events in a emotional fashion. The learner must make sense of the events experienced in terms of their own world” (pg. 115).

“The concept of reflection on an event or activity and subsequent analysis is the cornerstone of the experiential learning experience.” (pg. 116).

Origins of debriefing in simulation were from critical stress incident debriefing and to do this in a timely manner post incident, with the aim to stimulate group cohesion and empathy.

The Debriefing Process

  • Supportive climate; open, sharing, honest, free to learn.
  • Environment of trust; the pre-brief to explain the purpose of the simulation and what is to be expected.
  • The roles of debriefer and those to be debriefed.

Models of Debriefing

The aim of the debrief is to make sense of the event. The structure of the simulation may be:

  1. Experience the event,
  2. Reflect on the event,
  3. Discuss the event with other participants,
  4. Learn and modify behaviour learnt from the experience.

Objectives

As ever match learning such as the debriefing to the learning objectives. Allow emergent and evolving learning that occurs throughout the simulation process. “Two main questions:

  1. Which pieces of knowledge, skills, or knowledge are to be learned?
  2. What specifically should be learned about each of them?”

Role of The Facilitator

The facilitator will be a Co-learner in the simulation with the aim to guide and direct, rather than a traditional lecture based authoritarian approach. Debriefing is a skill and requires training and development. Resources such as the support from experts to guide and develop are important in developing simulation skills.

Debriefing 

Dismukes & Smith (2017) describe three levels of facilitation:

  1. High: High level facilitation actually requires low level of involvement from the facilitator. “Participants largely debrief themselves with the facilitator outlining the debriefing process and assisting by gently guiding the discussion only when necessary, and acting as a resource to ensure objectives are met” (pg 119).
  2. Intermediate: “An increased level of instructor involvement may be useful when the individual or team requires help to analyze the experience at a deep level, but are capable of much independent discussion” (pg 119).
  3. Low: “An intensive level of instructor involvement may be necessary where teams show little initiative or respond only superficially” (pg 120).

Summary 

The debrief is described as ” the heart and soul of the simulation”.

Resources

Dismukes, R. K., & Smith, G. M. (2017). Facilitation and debriefing in aviation training and operations. Routledge.

Fanning, R. M., & Gaba, D. M. (2007). The role of debriefing in simulation-based learning. Simulation in Healthcare, 2(2), 115-125.

Lederman, L. C. (1991, July). Differences that make a difference: Intercultural communication, simulation, and the debriefing process in diverse interaction. In Annual Conference of the International Simulation and Gaming Association, Kyoto, Japan (pp. 15-19).

Petranek, C. (1994). A maturation in experiential learning: Principles of simulation and gaming. Simulation & Gaming25(4), 513-523.

Thatcher, D. C., & Robinson, M. J. (1985). An introduction to games and simulations in education. Hants: Solent Simulations.

Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?

Journal Club Article: Reader, T. W., & Cuthbertson, B. H. (2011). Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?Critical care15(6), 313.

Background

Comparing the lessons learnt and development of team training approaches in the aviation industry to the complex needs of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The importance of teamwork and the coordination of behaviours in terms of patient care provided and subsequent outcomes. Higher levels of doctor-nurse collaboration improve safety and mortality rates. The recognised importance of poor communication which has been identified as a factor in medical error.

Team input and team processes = team output

  • Teamwork

“Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. ”

  • Active & Latent Failures

“team-related ‘active failures’ (for example, failures to communicate the proximity of nearby aircraft) and ‘latent failures’ (for example, lack of team training, poor ergonomic design, and organizational culture) that influence behavior and error in the cockpit.”

  • Decision Making Under Stress

“Techniques include exposing teams to high-stress situations, training pilots to facilitate team discussions before and after stressful team activities, and cross-training aircrew team members to understand the demands and needs of one another’s role. Teams are trained in a multidisciplinary environment…….”

  • Hierarchical Team Structures

The ability to understand other roles, so in stressful events still work together as a team and negative behaviours and attitudes don’t effect performance.

  • Environmental Factors

“Fatigue and stress are known to negatively influence performance in the ICU, and non-technical factors such as team communication, situation awareness, and decision making frequently underlie error.”

Developing a workplace culture based upon safety requires supporting and valuing staff in the high risk environment of ICU, with models of training and supervision that focuses not only on the norms of practice (normative) and educative training, but on restorative and supportive resources to improve stress and burnout, and aid personal development.

Keywords: Intensive Care Unit; Team Performance; Human FactorsTeam Training; Aviation Industry; Cognitive Load; Situation Awareness.

Relevant additional resources around some of the themes identified in this articles to aid collaborative educational teamwork:

 

 

 

Simulation Resources To Follow

Simulation is a key component of nursing and healthcare training, and the knowledge base is continually increasing with research publications, conferences, online and social media resources. To aid knowledge translation, the nurse educator needs to embrace a global network of resources not just confined to local knowledge. To keep current on simulation focused research, here are some resources that may help (no conflict of interest to report). As ever please add any suggestions of other resources you know about in the comments section at the bottom of this post and I will update the below resource list.

This post supplements the recent Journals For The Nurse Educator To Follow  and these journals will also include simulation research.

Simulation Focused Journals

Online & Social Media Resources

Clinical Reasoning Cycle

Book Club: Levett-Jones, T. (Ed.). (2013). Clinical reasoning: Learning to think like a nurse. Pearson Australia.

Clinical Reasoning Cycle

Define reasoning as “the process by which nurses (and other clinicians) collect cues, process the information, come to an understanding of a patient problem or situation, plan and implement interventions, evaluate outcomes, and reflect on and learn from the process”.

“Clinical reasoning is often confused with the terms ‘clinical judgement’, ‘problem solving’, decision making’ and ‘critical thinking’. While in some ways these terms are similar to critical reasoning, clinical reasoning is a cyclical process that often leads to a series or spiral of linked clinical encounters” (pg.4 Levett-Jones, 2013).

Stages of the Clinical Reasoning Cycle

  1. Consider the patient
  2. Collect cues/information
  3. Process information
  4. Identify problems/issues
  5. Establish goals
  6. Take action
  7. Evaluate outcomes
  8. Reflect on process and new learning

Why is this book important?

For nurse training and education delivery, the stages of clinical reasoning can be incorporated into training sessions to discuss the clinical judgments and decision making during a care intervention and applying the ‘nursing process’.  Simulated nursing environments are an ideal educational approach to challenge clinical decision making and clinical reasoning skills. Nurses are the constant presence on the ward level, providing the monitoring and making judgments form the clinical reasoning encounters every shift over a patients hospital journey. Responding to complex and time critical events requires sophisticated abilities which expand further than pure theoretical knowledge, such as assessing and responding to clinical deterioration.

In the current economic drive for cost cutting measures across healthcare (nurses make up the majority of the healthcare workforce, so are often seen as a costly element), the drive to replace with lower skilled, trainees and eventually robots are factors for the nursing profession to consider. Nurses need to be able to understand and explain the role they play and have a voice to raise the profile of what it entails to be a nurse and the efficacy of such skills to maintain levels of care and safety.

Summary

Thinking on the go and decision making are skills to develop over time and with experience but need to be incorporated into nurse training. Nurses with effective clinical reasoning skills have a positive impact on patient outcomes (School of Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Health, 2009). It’s important to remember, during all this consideration of the patient and reflective process that you (the nurse) are human and as such wont get everything correct all the time.

References

Levett-Jones, T. (Ed.). (2013). Clinical reasoning: Learning to think like a nurse. Pearson Australia.

Alfaro-LeFevre, R. (2015). Critical Thinking, Clinical Reasoning, and Clinical Judgment E-Book: A Practical Approach. Elsevier Health Sciences.

Interprofessional Ambulatory Care Unit. Clinical Reasoning User Manual. Edith Cowan University.

School of Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Health (2009) Clinical Reasoning Instructor Resources. University of Newcastle.

Peyton’s 4 Step Approach for Skills Teaching

We have all either delivered or been on the end of a “see one, do one” or “do one, teach one” approach to learning, often delivered in simulation with the aim for skill development. But maybe we should add another two-steps into the approach and follow Peyton’s four-step method. To aid the processing of information (learning) and then apply this new knowledge in context (situational awareness) the four-stage technique can be utilised.

Peyton’s Four-Step Approach: 

1. “The teacher demonstrates the skill at his normal pace without any comments (Demonstration)

2. The teacher repeats the procedure, this time describing all necessary sub-steps (Deconstruction)

3. The student has to explain each sub-step while the teacher follows the student’s instructions (Comprehension)

4. The student performs the complete skill himself on his own (Performance)” (Nikendei et al, 2014).

There are clearly defined instructional steps to guide educator and student. Provides small group or a 1:1 teacher:student ratio for successful instructional training in skills learning sims.

Keywords: Simulation; skills labs; 4-step; experiential learning; technical skills.

References

Bullock, I., Davis, M., Lockey, A., & Mackway-Jones, K. (Eds.). (2015). Pocket Guide to Teaching for Clinical Instructors. John Wiley & Sons.

International Clinician Educators (ICE) Blog. (2017). Effective teaching of technical skills requires more than see one do one. KeyLime podcast No. 142. ICE blog.

Münster, T., Stosch, C., Hindrichs, N., Franklin, J., & Matthes, J. (2016). Peyton’s 4-Steps-Approach in comparison: Medium-term effects on learning external chest compression–a pilot studyGMS journal for medical education33(4).

Nikendei, C., Huber, J., Stiepak, J., Huhn, D., Lauter, J., Herzog, W., … & Krautter, M. (2014). Modification of Peyton’s four-step approach for small group teaching–a descriptive study. BMC medical education14(1), 68.

Walker, M., & Peyton, J. W. R. (1998). Teaching in theatre. Teaching and learning in medical practice. Rickmansworth, UK: Manticore Europe Limited, 171-180.

Wang, T. S., Schwartz, J. L., Karimipour, D. J., Orringer, J. S., Hamilton, T., & Johnson, T. M. (2004). An Education Theory–Based Method to Teach a Procedural Skill. Archives of dermatology140(11), 1357-1361.

 

 

Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM)

Purpose

Development of a tool to measure teamwork performance in medical emergencies (TEAM measurement tool).

Background

The focus in healthcare on the importance of patient safety and developing safer healthcare systems. Reducing preventable errors in healthcare requires a culture of change. Errors are multi-factorial, but can be attributed to technical and non-technical skills as well as organisational issues. “The determinants of effective team performance include technical and nontechnical skills such as leadership and teamwork” (Cooper et al., 2010).

Key Performance Factors

  • Leadership skills
  • Team performance
  • Technical Skills
  • Task management
  • Non technical skills
  • Communication
  • Situational awareness
  • Environmental awareness

Findings

Study findings from the primary study found “TEAM was found to be a valid and reliable instrument and should be a useful addition to clinicians’ tool set for the measurement of teamwork during medical emergencies. Further evaluation of the instrument is warranted to fully determine its psychometric properties”.

Keywords: teamwork; situational awareness; training; debriefing; human factors.

References

Cooper, S. J., & Cant, R. P. (2014). Measuring non-technical skills of medical emergency teams: an update on the validity and reliability of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure. Resuscitation, 85(1), 31-33.

Cooper, S., Cant, R., Porter, J., Sellick, K., Somers, G., Kinsman, L., & Nestel, D. (2010). Rating medical emergency teamwork performance: development of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM). Resuscitation, 81(4), 446-452.

Monash University (2017) TEAM.

Monash University (2017) TEAM measurement tool.

Debriefing in Simulation Based Learning

Simulation in healthcare is a vital part of the educational approach to learning. For the adult learner this provides problem-centred, relevant and hands-on training (active participation) where past experiences are valued. Simulation training is part of an experiential learning educational approach (Rudolph et al, 2007; Fanning & Gaba, 2007).

So you have your training planned, with level of fidelity, equipment, instructor/s, learning objectives all organised? The next part is to review the breakdown of the session and ask yourself, ‘have I left enough time for the debrief at the end? Instead of leaving a hurried 10 mins at the end of the session, the structure should be more a 50:50 simulation to debrief time frame. The debrief is just as, maybe actually more important for learning and development to take place. Evidence for simulation skill training states that the learning effect maybe lasts 6-12 months (possibly even only 3 months) and should then be repeated, which does question the value of yearly competency training.

The human factors aspect of simulation training provide the task training but the debrief then allows meaning and sense from the training itself, with the adult learner moving towards the key learning objectives and adjusts their performance and actions (Rudolph et al, 2007). Across healthcare and emergency services (including armed forces) the use of critical incident stress debriefing has been formulated to provide a review of facts and perceptions to allow recovery from stress after a traumatic event. In essence the debrief is the reflective practice, and where the learning and development actually occurs.

Debriefing with Good Judgement by Rudolph et al (2007) 

  • Theory of using reflective practice for self-scrutiny.
  • Create a safe, yet challenging environment.
  • The sweet point on the stress curve to challenge the participant but not to breaking point.
  • Environment of trust.
  • Safe environment to make mistakes- this is where the educator can really try to understand the ‘framing’ of the situation from the learners perspective and then provide clarifying education to then eradicate the previous error. Its not a shame and blame situation.
  • Allow the difficult discussions to be discussed, critical judgements are valued as long as the discussion is respectful (advocacy and inquiry approach). This is important in healthcare training to be direct about critical errors observed to then eradicate.
  • Both instructors and participants views are valued in the discussion phases.

advocacy-inquiry

Summary

Rudolph et al (2007) describe the debrief as the ‘heart and soul’ of the simulation experience, so we really need to ensure we follow the debrief with good judgement principles.

References: 

Rudolph, J. W., Simon, R., Rivard, P., Dufresne, R. L., & Raemer, D. B. (2007). Debriefing with good judgment: combining rigorous feedback with genuine inquiry. Anesthesiology Clinics, 25(2), 361-376.

Fanning, R. M., & Gaba, D. M. (2007). The role of debriefing in simulation-based learning. Simulation in healthcare, 2(2), 115-125.

Thanks to Chris ‘LITFL‘ Nickson for guiding to these simulation resources.